Spay & Neuter Initiative

Animals spayed/neutered through AARCS’ SNAP Program in 2019!

At AARCS we advocate responsible pet ownership, which includes spay and neuter. Not only does spaying and neutering help control the amount of unwanted and euthanized animals in our community, it is important for your pet’s health and longevity.

All of AARCS animals are spayed/neutered prior to adoption. Overpopulation of pets in our province is a vast problem – become part of the solution, please spay and neuter your pets.

First Nations Spay Neuter Assistance Program

AARCS’ Spay Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP) is one of our many initiatives dedicated to offering affordable spay/neuter surgeries for dogs and cats in Alberta. It is our aim to provide a sustainable and accessible program that will significantly reduce the number of dogs and cats without homes, as well as enhance the health and well-being of pets.

Through our AARCS Veterinary Hospital, we offer spay/neuter services for both dogs and cats limited to First Nations Communities of Alberta.

Trap-Neuter-Return

TNR Program

TNR is a humane way of controlling, managing and reducing feral cat populations in rural areas and communities. This is accomplished by humanely trapping cats that are living in colonies in small towns or on farms and acreages. Once they have been trapped, the cats are brought to AARCS’ Veterinary Hospital where they are medically assessed, spayed/neutered, vaccinated, dewormed and given some form of identification; most commonly a tattoo. The tattoo allows us to easily determine if a cat has already been spayed or neutered. Once this is completed and the cats have been given time to heal, they will be released back at the property where they were trapped; the place they call home. A caregiver must be identified to watch over the colony and stay in touch with AARCS in case new cats appear on the property and need to be fixed. By partnering with rural property owners and municipalities, AARCS is able to futher assist with locating and providing medical care to sick and injured feral cats in the colony and occasionally place suitable cats in our regular adoption program.

Many of the cat colonies that we come across have been left unmanaged. An area already suffering from an excess of cats often becomes a common dumping ground for unwanted and unaltered cats, further exacerbating the problem. Left unchecked, these populations will grow exponentially and make it difficult for the caregivers, property owners or communities to gain control without outside help. A cat colony can range in size from a few cats to dozens of cats and there may be several colonies on a property.

AARCS focuses on cases in rural Alberta. For more information on our TNR program or to apply for TNR assistance please email [email protected].

Spay Neuter Partnerships

AARCS partners with the Canadian Animal Task Force to assist in their onsite spay/neuter clinics providing volunteers, equipment, and financial support.