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Canine Trivia

[Fascinating Canine Trivia and Other Fun Facts]

Handsome Samson, available for adoption! ID# A39834814

Handsome Samson, available for adoption! ID# A39834814


Written by Ioana Busuioc, November 2018

We could all learn a little something from our canine companions, like the great Nora Roberts said: “Everything I know I learned from dogs”. But before learning something from our dogs, why not learn a little something about them?!

Dogs are aware of the passing of time! That means they miss you when you’re gone, and they know when it’s time to eat or go for a walk. They are intuitive enough to pick up up on our routines and habits. Dogs also have a very precise sense of hearing, and though they are born deaf, they grow to be able to detect a frequency range of 67 to 45,000 hertz; much like us however, their hearing can deteriorate. Dogs can also smell certain human states and feelings, for example nervousness through our perspiration, or even pregnancy! Their sense of smell overall can be up to 10 million times better than ours too, and depending on the breed, dogs have between 125 million to 300 million scent glands.

With how many dog breeds exist in the world (approximately 344), it’s no wonder that there are so many fun facts and quirks to many of them. For instance, the Newfoundland dog has a water resistant coat and webbed feet! Dalmatians are born white and develop their distinct spots as they age. The Basenji dog makes yodel-like noises in lieu of barks, making it a fun surprise to hear for the first time! As cute as Dachshunds are, they were actually originally bred to fight badgers. Sharp-Pei’s have a purple tinted tongue!

Sweet Mya waiting patiently for her furrrever home! ID# A39806725

Sweet Mya waiting patiently for her furrrever home! ID# A39806725

Most dog lovers will agree that dogs are cooler than people any day of any week, but here are some extra cool pups:

Bill Irwin was a blind medical technologist and corporate manager who traversed the 2100 mile long journey along the Appalachian trail. He was celebrated as an inspiration to hikers and disabled people when he became the first blind man to undertake such a feat. He could not have accomplished this without his trusty German Shepherd guide dog, Orient. The pair were lovingly referred to as “the Orient Express”.

Bretagne was “a whip-smart golden retriever with feathery fur and a sunny smile“, who had lived a life more full than most of us can say ever will. The adventure-loving pup, along with her owner Denise Corliss, had their first assignment together searching for survivors at Ground Zero after the 9/11 attacks. Later on, she participated in rescue efforts after Hurricanes Katrina and Ivan, and even even made an appearance at the Winter Olympic Games. After retiring, she began volunteering as a reading assistance dog at an elementary school.

Rin Tin Tin was another famous German Shepherd who starred in the film that is “often credited with bringing Warner Bros. back from bankruptcy”. He was rescued from a French battlefield by American soldier Lee Duncan, who brought him to the US and got him his role in “Where the North Begins”.

Hachiko was an Akita dog best known for his loyalty and dedication to his owner even after his death. He would meet his owner at Shibuya Station in Japan every day until his owner died of a cerebral hemorrhage; even after this, every day for nine years Hachiko would return to the station at the time his owner used to arrive at.

The first animal to orbit earth was a dog named Laika. She was a stray dog found on the streets of Moscow who was trained for the Soviet space program in 1957, eventually being selected as the occupant of Sputnik. A statue was erected in the pioneering pooch’s honor in 2008.

The evolution of dogs can be traced back to 50 million years ago, with many scientists believing the grey wolf or jackal are the dog’s ancestors. The Saluki, from Saluk, Yemen, is the earliest identifiable purebred dog; excavations have revealed carvings of dogs closely resembling the Saluki. The domestication of dogs began with prehistoric men who, having realized they had nothing to fear from the animals, started throwing them scraps of food. This led to the dogs feeling safe around the humans and developed a long lasting bond between the two. The Ancient Greeks are said to have developed lap dogs, and they were meant to keep a woman’s stomach warm. Bulldogs were bread originally with their large jaws and short noses so that they could “hang onto the throat of a bull and still be able to breathe”. Though Egyptians were famously known for revering cats, they also deeply respected dogs, burying faithful dogs alongside their owners. Henry III of France allegedly had such a fondness for dogs that he had amassed at least 2000 dogs spread across his palaces. Currently, Queen Elizabeth II is an avid dog lover, having owned 14 generations of corgis dating back 8 decades; she has owned more than 30 corgis, with many of them descending from her very first dog, Susan, who she had received as an 18th birthday present.

Smiley Iris gazing into the distance (or on the lookout for her forever family!) ID# A39020998

Smiley Iris gazing into the distance (or on the lookout for her forever family!) ID# A39020998

Some other pup aficionados? Alexander the Great had a beloved dog named Peritas, and when he died, Greek historian Plutarch wrote that Alexander founded an entire city and gave it his dog’s name. Fur real! Catherine the Great of Russia had a portrait of herself commissioned with her favorite Italian greyhound, Zemira. Leona Helmsley’s death meant that her beloved pooch Trouble inherited $2 million, not a ruff life at all! Cinema beauty Elizabeth Taylor once famously said that “some of [her] best leading men have been dogs and horses”; the actress treasured many dogs throughout her life, favoring Maltese terriers. Some famous Presidential doggo lovers include George Washington, who had 10 hounds, Calvin Coolidge, who owned at least 12 dogs during his lifetime, and Barack Obama, who owns Bo and Sunny, two Portuguese WaterDogs.

Lastly, to quote the author of the biggest tearjerker of all time, Marley & Me: “Such short little lives our pets have to spend with us, and they spend most of it waiting for us to come home each day” – John Grogan

Thank you kindly for reading, I hope this was helpful and informative!

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AARCS Dogs 4Ioana Busuioc
Blog and Website Content Creator

Got ideas for our next blog? Email me at blog@aarcs.ca!

Rescue Pet Mythbusting Pt. 3

[Rescue Pet Mythbusting Pt. 3]

 

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Beautiful floof Kodiak, up for adoption through AARCS, ID # A37928147!

Written by Ioana Busuioc, October 2018

Special thanks to our fabulous Animal Behavior Coordinator Natasha Pupulin for her help on behavioral and temperament-related content!

The third and final part of the three part series. Enjoy!

Myth #7

“You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”

Reality: The beauty with animals is that, much like people, they all have their own unique ways of learning. If something doesn’t stick, there are many resources at one’s disposal to try and explore alternative ways of approaching training differently. Similarly to humans, dogs go through a series of development stages as they grow; just like babies, puppies are naturally curious and learn from experiencing the world, but as they grow, they require more structured learning in order to acquire and retain new information. For example, a dog who has grown up in the absence of sidewalks may find it hard to walk so close to strangers and moving cars. This could cause them to experience discomfort, or potentially feel unsafe for them. By using targeted techniques that address the underlying fears that the dog has about this activity, we can teach the dog that the whole experience of being on a sidewalk is safe and fun! If we break this challenge down into manageable pieces for the dog, reinforce choices and experiences with high value reinforcement, we can affect change, promote a feeling of safety for the dog, and thus successfully overcome this obstacle! Having a fully stocked toolbox of techniques and knowledge that are specific to your adult dog, adolescent, or puppy, will make sure you are successful in whatever you set out to accomplish. The behaviour team is well versed in the next steps for your foster, and will often share recommendations on your dog’s file that you may find helpful in selecting a dog that you will enjoy working with, as well as the techniques that the dog requires for success.

Snuggly gal Posie, up for adoption! ID # A39891939

Snuggly gal Posie, up for adoption! ID # A39891939

Myth #8

The age of the dog will determine the activity level, and therefore it is an important factor to consider when adopting a dog.

Reality: Not at all! As Natasha, our Animal Behaviour Coordinator, states, she can “think of tons of cases where 4 month old puppies, teenagers, and young adults, have arrived at AARCS and in foster homes and act nothing like their age”. Energy and playfulness are primarily determined by the dog’s perception of safety in their environment and their level of socialization. Where there is a lack of perceived safety, or socialization, the dog may choose to suppress otherwise normal play or movement in favour of drawing as little attention to themselves as possible. Although age may be important to families considering the amount of time they will spend with their new furry family member, it should not be used as an indicator of activity alone. Talking to our knowledgeable adoption counselors and/or foster parents will give a much clearer understanding on whether the dog’s energy fits with your family’s expectations and lifestyle.

 

Myth #9

The adoption process takes too much time, or it is too difficult.

Reality: The adoption process through a rescue is comprised of several steps, but it is only because we are dedicated to ensuring that the animal is placed in its forever home with the right family, home, lifestyle, and so forth. The procedure is there to make your life (and the animal’s!) easier, since it goes beyond simply giving a pet a home, but more so giving a pet the RIGHT home, their forever home, and of course, so that the new owner(s) know more accurately what the animal will be like. AARCS’ adoption procedures are as follows:

Step 1. Completing the appropriate adoption application form, all of which are located online at http://aarcs.ca/application-forms

Step 2. The Adoptions Coordinator will review the application and email the applicant typically between 24 and 48 hours

Step 3. Upon the approval of the application, if there is a foster family, they will contact the applicant within 48 hours to arrange a “meet and greet”, which all family members must attend

Note: If you have cats and/or dogs, all family dogs must be present for the “meet and greet” for adoptable dogs. Cats do not need to attend these meetings and dogs do not need to attend them for adoptable cats, only dogs. Slow introductions with cats are always strongly encouraged!

Step 4. For a dog adoption, we request that applicants take a day to think about your decision, and to discuss the potential adoption openly and fully with all members of the household. If the applicant makes a decision, they are to contact the Adoption Coordinator with their decision at adoptions@aarcs.ca no later than 24 hours after the meeting.

How has this cutie not been snagged up yet?! Neon is available for adoption, ID # A39230855

How has this cutie not been snagged up yet?! Neon is available for adoption, ID # A39230855

For a cat adoption, the same guidelines apply, however we do permit same day adoptions. Should the applicant decide on a same day adoption, they must come prepared with a pet carrier. Applicants must pay the adoption fee and provide proof of payment to the foster home before the cat can be released. Adoption fees can be paid online on our website, by calling or visiting our shelter during business hours, or in some cases we can accept e-transfers as well, and we encourage applicants to talk to the Adoptions Coordinator for more information! For kittens under the age of 6 months, we prefer homes with existing feline companions, as kittens require significant stimulation and interaction with other cats/kittens for healthy social development, as well as taking into consideration that kittens with litter-mates or cat companions tend to be happier and healthier.

Step 5. If all parties are in favor of the adoption (adoption committee, foster family, and prospective adoptive family), and it is not a same day cat adoption, applicants can pick up their new family member the following day or arrange for a mutually beneficial time with the foster home. Please be prepared for your new pet, with food, bed, toys, and bowls before he or she comes home!

Note: AARCS provides vaccinations for all animals while in our care, however the adoptive family is responsible for vaccinations and continued deworming that come due after the adoption is completed. All AARCS animals are spayed or neutered prior to adoption, and this cost is included in the adoption fee.

Myth #10

Shelter dogs will have more health problems that I will end up having to pay for.

Reality: One of the best things about AARCS as a shelter in particular is that we have a vet clinic on site through which all animals get treated, vaccinated, and operated upon! By adoption from a shelter, potential adopters can more easily ensure that the animal they are interested in has already been seen by a veterinarian and all health concerns are transparent and well documented. Again, we want to ensure the best possible match for adopter and pet alike, and this certainly includes a level of health that is appropriate for the adopter’s capabilities. Yes, there are some animals that will end up requiring treatment for either short term periods of time or for long term periods of time, but we do not want to hide this for the sake of an adoption. Some individuals are better suited and in positions in which they can more readily take care of animals with various health conditions, the same way certain individuals may not be ready for a special needs animal. It’s also worth keeping in mind that shelter dogs come in many breeds and sizes, but because many of them are mixed-breed, this gives them better genetic variety, which can ultimately lead to healthier lives!

Note: If an applicant is interested in a special needs pet or one that will require more careful medical attention, AARCS is well equipped to ensure the applicant has all the necessary information and support moving forward!

Louis SQ

Thank you so much for taking the time to read this article, and keep in mind that any questions regarding adoption can be sent to adoptions@aarcs.ca for dogs, or catadoptions@aarcs.ca for cats! Our dedicated staff is always ready to make sure potential applicants get the information they need to ensure a match made in heaven!


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Campbell Thornton, K. (March 7th, 2007). The ABCs of Adopting a Purebred Dog from an Animal Shelter, retrieved from http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/the-abcs-of-adopting-a-purebred-dog-from-an-animal-shelter
Ioana Busuioc
Blog and Website Content Creator

Got ideas for our next blog? Email me at blog@aarcs.ca!

October 20, 2018

 

 

Rescue Pet Mythbusting(Part 2)

[Rescue Pet Mythbusting Part. 2]

Photo courtesy of Alexei Chernenkoff Photography

Written by Ioana Busuioc, August 2018

Special thanks to our fabulous Animal Behavior Coordinator Natasha Pupulin for her help on behavioral and temperament-related content!

The second part of this three part myth busting series! Read on for some more fast facts and informative debunking!

Myth #4

Adoption fees are too expensive.

Reality: Adoption fees may seem daunting, but keep in mind that shelters provide care and medical assistance for the animals present and these adoption fees, alongside donations, are what help shelters stay afloat and continue caring for thousands of animals each year. AARCS spays and neuters all animals prior to adoptions, and we provide vaccinations for all animals while in our care, this is included in the adoption fee. Adoptive families are however responsible for vaccinations and continued treatments after the adoption process. AARCS’ adoption fees are as follows:

  • $375 for dogs 7 months and older
  • $495 for dogs 6 months and under
  • $200 for senior dogs 8 years and older
  • $150 for cats 7 months and older
  • $225 for two cats 7 months and older (bonded pair)
  • $200 for a single kitten 6 months and under
  • $400 for two kittens 6 months and under
  • $60 for senior cats over 9 years

Myth #5

Knowing the breed or the mix will help you to understand temperament.

Reality: This is incorrect! If we know what a dog’s parental lineage was, such as a german shepard mother and a husky father, there is no way to know which genes have been passed down to the pup. This is especially relevant for temperament, intelligence, social skills, etc. The best way to get a genuine feel for a dog’s temperament is not to go by breed, but by getting to know the individual, read body language daily, and provide training support as needed. This is facilitated through AARCS with the intake assessment and our foster program, which helps us successfully match potential adopters with the right dog, not the right breed.  As a matter of fact, many shelters have moved from a specified breed to a “mixed breed” designation, unless that dog’s lineage is known and many find this helps improve the chances of finding the perfect match – without breed bias.

Myth #6

Getting a puppy is the best option because you know what you’re getting.

Reality: Not necessarily true. There is the appealing prospect of being able to shape the puppy as it grows, however puppies do not reach emotional and behavioural maturity until about 3 years of age. During this time, puppies go through a series of experiences, development stages, and fear imprinting periods that will shape their behaviours into adulthood. Adult dogs older than 3 years old will afford you more reliability in assessing behaviours long term. If there are ever any traits that may seem undesirable to you as a potential pet owner, adult dogs typically already have their own characteristics and behaviours set out, so it is much easier to know what you are getting. Additionally, puppies require A LOT of work, attention, and training, whereas adult dogs may already have some training!

It is fair to state though, that based on experience, any adult, puppy, or adolescent may experience behaviour changes throughout their lifetimes, however the variation is greater in puppies when compared to adults after a period of assessment in foster care or in your home.

Thank you kindly for reading, I hope this was helpful and informative!


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Pandora_9

Photo credits to Alexei Chernenkoff

Ioana Busuioc
Blog and Website Content Creator

Got ideas for our next blog? Email me at blog@aarcs.ca!

August 25, 2018
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[ Rescue Pet Mythbusting ]

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Written by Ioana Busuioc, July 2018

Special thanks to our fabulous Animal Behavior Coordinator Natasha Pupulin for her help on behavioral and temperament-related content!

When considering adopting a pet, many people wonder where the best place to get their new furry companion will be. There are numerous options, such as pet stores, breeders, even online on websites such as Kijiji, but the best option by far is through a rescue organization. That being said, rescue pets can often be at the center of misunderstandings due to various myths and misconceptions. Read on for some informative debunking!

Myth #1

One of the most common misconception about shelter pets is that they have behavioral issues that cannot be fixed.

Reality: It’s important to know that rescued animals come from all sorts of backgrounds, and yes, some of those backgrounds might be rooted in an undesirable or harmful situation for an animal, but the majority are happy-go-lucky pets who are ready for their forever home. Some animals end up in a shelter because they grew up without a family, their family can no longer care for them, their owners have passed away, from being lost and unable to reunite with their owners. Beyond this, there are animals who are rescued from hoarding situations, abusive situations. Naturally, animals who come from the aforementioned situations might experience cautiousness, fear, shyness, and so on. The most important thing to remember is that many of these  issues are resolved with time, love, patience, and training from their fosters and adopters.At AARCS, it is why fostering and daily interaction with animals is crucial in order to help rescues come out of their shells and feel safe and secure so that their personalities may shine through for their future families. If there are ever issues related to the training of an animal, more commonly dogs, they are also addressed within shelter, and  they continue into foster care to increase the animal’s adoptability. A reputable rescue will always disclose any existing concerns for your consideration prior to adopting, and will advise you about the prognosis for resolving those issues so you and your family can make a choice that is right for you.

 

An example of behavior we deal with that can be a concern to prospective pet owners is resource guarding. Contrary to popular belief, resource guarding behaviours do not originate from dogs raised in free-roaming environments or a history of scavenging behaviour. In fact, we see this behaviour reported in less than 1% of our dogs when observed in shelter and in home environments. Resource guarding can happen to any breed and at an age, and studies show that there is no clear correlation between genetics and this type of behavior. It is considered a fear-based behavior, and it is more often seen in dogs who are stressed and lack confidence. There are various ways of approaching this type of behavior, but ultimately there is a solution through consistency, patience, and care. Resource guarding is highly manageable, and in many cases, can be resolved quickly and easily using desensitization and counterconditioning techniques.

Myth #2

I don’t know what I’m getting with a rescue pet.

Reality: While it is true that shelters may not have significant information on various animals as they get taken in, organizations aim to put in the time and effort to get to know the animal before putting it up for adoption. AARCS is fortunate enough to have an Animal Behavior Coordinator. Natasha, and more than 600 dedicated caregivers and foster homes  who take it upon themselves to improve adoptability rates, enrich the shelter environment, and deliver effective, kind and entertaining training activities to improve the quality of life for the animals in AARCS’ care as well as for their post-adoption lives! While breeders and retail stores might concern themselves more with quick turnovers, shelters like AARCS aim towards making great matches! It’s important to know that many of the animals taken in benefit from staying with a foster family prior to adoption. This is helpful for a few reasons, but most importantly it gets an animal the chance to get socialized with people, as well as potentially children or other animals, so that their personality can shine through and they can ultimately get adopted into the perfect family. All in all, animals that come through shelters get a lot of time and attention given to them so that rescue workers can be able to pinpoint any issues, address them, and cultivate positive traits and behaviors.

Myth #3

Getting a puppy is the best option because you know what you’re getting.

Reality: Not necessarily true. There is the appealing prospect of being able to shape the puppy as it grows, however puppies do not reach emotional and behavioural maturity until about 3 years of age. During this time, puppies go through a series of experiences, development stages, and fear imprinting periods that will shape their behaviours into adulthood. Adult dogs older than 3 years old will afford you more reliability in assessing behaviours long term. If there are ever any traits that may seem undesirable to you as a potential pet owner, adult dogs typically already have their own characteristics and behaviours set out, so it is much easier to know what you are getting. Additionally, puppies require A LOT of work, attention, and training, whereas adult dogs may already have some training!

It is fair to state tough, that based on experience, any adult, puppy, or adolescent may experience behaviour changes throughout their lifetimes, however the variation is greater in puppies when compared to adults after a period of assessment in foster care or in your home.

Thank you kindly for reading, I hope this was helpful and informative!


Warner 05

Ioana Busuioc
Blog and Website Content Creator

Got ideas for our next blog? Email me at blog@aarcs.ca!

July 5, 2018
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AARCS in Desperate Need of Financial Assistance

AARCS in Desperate Need of Financial Assistance Due to Mounting Vet Bills

Press Release

November 6th, 2016 – Calgary, AB – On October 28th, 2016 the Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society (AARCS) received a call about a dog in desperate need of help. Rescuers headed out immediately and found Panzer, a 4 month old mixed breed puppy in a rural area of Alberta suffering from extensive damage to both his front legs. He was rushed back to Calgary where veterinarians assessed and suspected he had been attacked by a wild animal. Panzer’s right elbow was broken and left ulna was shattered. In addition, he was septic and severely anemic. Once stable, Panzer underwent surgery to repair both broken front legs — one so badly damaged the bone was sticking out of the skin.

Panzer

Panzer

Panzer is one of over 500 animals in the care of the Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society. He is now in an AARCS’ medical recovery foster home where he is receiving daily bandage changes and getting lots of love and attention. “He is the sweetest little dog and even though he has been through so much, he is still such a happy puppy,” says AARCS foster parent and Medical Manager, Ariana Lenz. “Thanks to AARCS, he is going to completely recover from this traumatic event.”

“The calls don’t seem to ever stop. We are currently dealing with 144 animals in need of medical care, and this is over and above basic spay/neuter and vaccines,” said Deanna Thompson, Executive Director of AARCS. “We don’t want to turn these animals away, but at some point we are going to have to unless we can raise more funds to pay the mounting veterinary bills.”

During Alberta’s hard economic times, many non-profits are feeling the effects. AARCS has already spent $785,000 in veterinary bills so far this year and expects that number to exceed one million before the end of the year. Paying for basic medical costs such as spay/neuter surgeries and vaccines are often covered by adoption fees, but having to deal with so many major medical cases has put the organization in the tough position of potentially having to turn away animals in need. “As the cold weather approaches, the number of animals in need will continue to increase. We need to raise additional funds to get us through the winter months,” says Thompson.

AARCS is reaching out to the public in hopes of garnering additional support to help get through these tough economic times and help animals like Panzer. If you would like to help, please consider donating to AARCS on their website at www.aarcs.ca/Donate. In addition, AARCS is hosting a fundraising event on November 19th at Vagabond in Calgary, tickets are $40 each or two for $70 and available on AARCS’ website www.aarcs.ca/DiamondintheRuff.

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AARCS_vetfund AARCS_Donate

 

For more information, please contact:

Deanna Thompson, Executive Director

Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society (AARCS)

Bay G, 3851 – 21 Street NE

Calgary, AB T2E 6T5

Cell: 403-869-4694

Email: deanna@aarcs.ca

Diamond in the Ruff


Diamond in the Ruff

10 Year Anniversary Celebration!

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When:  Saturday, November 19th, 2016
Time: 7:30PM – MIDNIGHT
Where: Vagabond, 1129 Olympic Way SE, Calgary, AB T2G 0L4
Price: $40 PER TICKET OR TWO FOR $70
About: Come celebrate our 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY with us! Each ticket comes with a free drink ticket and a small assortment of appetizers. Put on your cocktail dress, grab a date and put on your dancing shoes! We will have a DJ, beer and wine tastings, and a couple of surprises in store! This is an event you will not want to miss! More details to come!

★ Our Title Sponsor is BowDog Canine Specialists! Our additional Gold Sponsors are End Of The Roll, SH&E Systems Solutions Inc. and Servus Credit Union ★

During the evening of, we will be raffling off a 14 Karat white gold pendant and chain (by Studio Tzela) with a 4.736 Carat Rough Diamond. It’s a unique, one of a kind piece! Donated to help the Animals of AARCS by Troy Shoppe Jewellers 

Celebrate a decade of AARCS, with more years to come! It’s going to be an evening you’ll never forget!

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Since 2006, AARCS has rescued, rehabilitated and re-homed 9,000 ANIMALS, which is absolutely remarkable!


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AARCS Jail n’ Bail – Sept 17 2016 – Calgary


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AARCS Jail n’ Bail 2016

The AARCS Jail ‘n Bail 2016 was a huge success thanks to all of you! All together we raised $60,000 for the animals of AARCS! It’s hard to believe, but these funds will cover ONLY ONE MONTH of our veterinary bills! Even after this, we’re still running at a $100,000 deficit for the year and are so thankful for this boost to help move us in the right direction!

This event would not have been possible without our event sponsors: Western Veterinary Specialist and Emergency Centre and Makami College and all of our other festival displays. A HUGE THANKS to our fantastic ‘Jailee’ participants and of course to each and every one of you who attended and/or donated to help bail them out of jail!!!

Thank you to the Calgary Police Service Officers who helped lock up our Prisoners of Love! We would like to extend another BIG thanks to Jay and Tank who raised just over $17,000 alone for #AARCS!

2016 JAIL N BAIL TOTAL - OFFICERS WITH JAY:TANK
…More photos to come soon! Stay tuned!

 

 

When:  September 17, 2016
Time:  10 am – 4 pm
Where:  AARCS Safe Haven (Bay G, 3851 21 Street NE)
Price:  FREE!
About:
On Saturday, September 17th, 2016 the Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society – AARCS will be hosting its third annual Jail ‘N Bail fundraiser! The event will be held at our Safe Haven shelter, (Bay G, 3851 21st Street NE) from 10am to 4pm. We will be jailing very special VIP’s in AARCS dog kennels (fur friends too!) and they will only be released when they have raised the pre-set amount of money to be bailed (or bail-out time if they aren’t so lucky)!
This family-fun event will have a street festival, kids area, food trucks, adoptable animals on site and more! Invite your friends and family and enjoy some fun under the sun!
*New this year* We will have a beer garden on site open from 10 am – 3 pm! Thank you so much to Molson Canadian for sponsoring!

THANK YOU TO OUR EVENT SPONSORS:

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Sponsorship and Vendor Booths available!

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Jail is FULL! You can apply for our waiting-list!


Bail Them Out!

Ivy McPhate | $2,250 BAIL Tamara O’Neill (Pug & Poodle) and Buttons the Amazing Foster Pup | $1,500 BAIL Robyn Pagenkopf & Sunny | $2,000 BAIL
Michelle Janzen Red-ee & Pebbles | $2,000 BAIL  Amber Bottrell & Maggie | $1,500 BAIL Brooke Jensen “Miss Teen Calgary” | $1,500 BAIL
Clarissa Stetten, Aragon & Opie | $2,500 BAIL Jay Jokisch & Tank | $15,000 BAIL Julie Brose, Luna & Chandler | $2,500 BAIL
Travis Deslaurier “Trav Beach Boy” | $1,500 BAIL Nirmala Naidoo, Jaidon & Coco | $1,500 BAIL Kelidh Hicks & Daxter (AARCS Adoptable Dog) | $2,000 BAIL
Pete the Plumber & Dino | $1,500 BAIL Sarah Keilbach | $2,200 BAIL Darlene Mckinnon | $1,500 BAIL
Krystal Stewart CJay 92 Host & Didi (AARCS Adoptable Dog) | $2,000 BAIL Julie Osiow, Dolly & Sally | $3,000 BAIL Jessica Churchill “Junior Miss Calgary 2016″ & Bella | $1,500 BAIL
Tamara Wrigley “The Calm Cat”
& Kittens
 | $2,000 BAIL
 Jessica Shalanski & Sheila | $1,500 BAIL Curtis Manning – Calgary Roughnecks & Briarley | $5,000 BAIL
Trevor Cobb & Coheed | $1,500 BAIL Kelsey Moore – XL 103 Radio Host & Oliver, Grandpa Pug| $1,500 BAIL  Leane Ingram & Reece | $1,500 BAIL

 


EVENT FESTIVAL BOOTHS:

 

 

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